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Keeping patients at the heart of our approach

The management of cancer-related conditions can be hard for the patient and their family, so it is essential to create places that are warm, comforting, and  welcoming. That’s why, for the new Integrated Oncology Centre of the University Hospital of Liège, we’ve included plenty of windows and openings out onto nature: offering the patient soothing spaces and views to provide a mental escape.

In the new specialised ‘hub’, we have structured the different levels to provide plenty of natural light for patients and staff, especially in medical and technical services such as radiotherapy, which is more commonly located in basements. The natural light is brought to the heart of the project and reaches the lower levels via a series of courtyards carved into the building.

The courtyards carved into the building provide natural light and visual escape

Harmoniously placed on a remarkable site

The Sart Tilman site is remarkable for both its architecture and its landscape. To ensure our development fitted respectfully into this context, we conducted in-depth work to integrate the buildings and surrounding areas into the natural site. The plantations and green spaces ensure continuity with the surrounding environment. We included planted slopes to ensure the stability of the building and roads, and added green roofs will create horizontal “green facades”, visible from different areas of the building.

We are supporting soft mobility with a new walkway along the road that bypasses the site. The wooded area around the building will eventually be a place where patients can seek nature and calm.

The management of cancer-related conditions can be hard for the patient and their family, so it is essential to create places that are warm, comforting, and  welcoming.

Martin Monnart ir. architect, partner

Sustainable materials that respect the existing buildings

The facades’ light grey architectural concrete recalls the exposed concrete featured in the architect Charles Vandenhove’s initial project. The large bay windows in low emissivity clear glass offer wide views of the landscape while ensuring contemporary energy performance. Our choice of wood facade was also motivated by our desire to use natural and recyclable materials, ensuring the integration of buildings in the natural landscape. Playing with light, the cladding offers easy maintenance and consistent appearance thanks to its unique composition.

We have also featured wood here and there inside the building, through furniture specifically designed for the project or even doors and ceilings, contributing to the healthy and soothing atmosphere. We primarily chose simple and bright palettes for the interiors, focusing mainly on lighter tones.

Waiting room

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